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Once Upon A Time: Storytelling in Westport

Once Upon a Time 2018

 

Saturday 13 October 2018

10-12pm Workshops  — Registration Only, Limited Spaces

2-4pm Performance  — Entrance by Donation

Westport United Church

Rediscover the power, joy, and art of storytelling. WAC is very proud to welcome master storytellers Jennifer Cayley and Ellis Lynn Duschenes for “Once Upon A Time.” Our day of storytelling in Westport boasts two workshops and a feature performance “Stories that Challenge and Change”.

 

Adult Workshop with Jen Cayley

$25   Adults Only Max. 12

United Church Hall

You will hear one or two good stories and take part in a number of participatory exercises that will help you discover yourself as a teller. As well there will be information about how to get started and where to find good stories. While the workshop will be based in traditional material, it will help you grow as a teller no matter what kind of material you want to tell.

 

Youth Workshop with Ellis Lynn Duschenes

$10  Ages 10-12  Max. 10

St. Paul’s Anglican Church Hall

A morning for discovering some great stories, for finding out about what makes them great, and to learn a bit about how you might be a great storyteller yourself.

Bring open ears, hearts and minds (along with a snack!) for all the energy you will need to fuel this grand adventure.

 

Workshops by advance registration only!

Email your name, contact info, and complete E-Transfer to:

 info@westportartscouncil.com. 

OR

Phone Robin at 613-273-9195 for in-person booking and payment.

 

Meet the Storytellers

Ellis Lynn Duschenes is a founder of the Ottawa Storytellers and has been telling for at least three decades. As well as being an exceptionally skillful teller, she is a passionate listener. Traditional folk and fairy tales along with ancient epic and myth are the foundation of her storytelling work. When she was an elementary school teacher, Ellis Lynn’s classroom was always alive with stories of every kind.

Jennifer Cayley has been telling stories across Canada and beyond, for more than a quarter century. Her repertoire includes traditional, epic, literary, historical and personal material. Jennifer believes passionately that stories, especially the old traditional ones, are important to all of us as we struggle to understand the shape and meaning of our lives.

 

 

Hoe Down Roundup

The WAC Hoe Down was a fun-filled family day full of music, food, and furry friends. We were also proud to celebrate our sponsors and volunteers who have donated generously to make WAC all that it is and can be. Thanks to everyone who came out!

 

Special Thanks to:

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Wayne Mulville

West Winds Ranch

Julie Ryder

Paul Herlehy

Scheuermann Family & The Figure Skating Club

Chief Barnardi & the Fire Department

Village of Westport

Winter Carnival Recap

It could have been -30 and Westport still would have showed up for the Winter Carnival! Hang on…it was that cold!! Horse drawn carriage rides, ice sculpting, the petting zoo and the competitive winter games were no match for the freezing temperatures. Well, maybe for the cold goats. Thanks to all those who came out! Please post any more photos on our Facebook page!

 

Totem Poles with Diane Black

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Totem Poles at Rideau Vista Public School

 

464 slabs of clay, 116 young artists, 8 totem poles

 

There is a new art installation at Rideau Vista Public School, actually there are 7.  Guided by local artist Diane Black, the seven totem poles are the collective creativity of all 116 students at Rideau Vista.

Black spent the last week of May working directly with each selected class, from kindergarten all the way to the grade five students. Explaining the importance of the totem pole in Canadian history, the student were then invited to think about what symbols would best represent them on a totem pole.

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Each student was then given four slabs of wet clay to carve out their chosen totems. Many students chosen family, sports, and nature symbols. When all four pieces of clay were designed, Black helped the students assemble the individual pieces together to form a box shape with no top or bottom.

Black collected all the carved clay boxes and took them home with her to dry. After firing all 116 pieces in her kiln, Black returned to Rideau Vista to slide each piece on seven 4×4 wooden posts, one post for each class. DSC06751

Just before the end of the year, Black will return to the school and disassemble the clay totem poles so each student can take their piece home with them.